Download Pocket Rough Guide New York City (Rough Guide Pocket Guides) PDF

Pocket Rough Guide New York City (Rough Guide Pocket Guides)
Name: Pocket Rough Guide New York City (Rough Guide Pocket Guides)
Author: martin dunford
Pages: 210
Year: 2010
Language: English
File Size: 23 MB
Downloads: 0
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3 << GRAND CENTRAL TERMINAL < THE CHRYSLER INTRODUCTION 4 BEST OF NEW YORK CITY12 PLACES 30 ACCOMMODATION AA174 ESSENTIALS 184 Contents New York City at a glance ...........7 Itineraries .................................8 Big sights ................................ 14 Hidden New York ......................16 Museums and galleries ............18 Eating out ................................ 20Drinking .................................. 22Entertainment ..........................24Shopping ................................. 26Outdoors ................................. 28 1 Financial District and the Harbor Islands ...................32 2 Soho and Tribeca ................44 3 Chinatown, Little Italy and Nolita ................................ 54 4 The Lower East Side ...........62 5 The East Village .................70 6 The West Village ................82 7 Chelsea and the Meatpacking District ..............................928 Union Square, Gramercy Park and the Flatiron District .....100 9 Midtown ...........................108 10 Times Square and the Theater District .............................122 11 Central Park .....................132 12 The Upper East Side...........136 13 The Upper West Side .........146 14 Harlem and north Manhattan ...156 15 The outer boroughs .............162 Hotels ....................................176 Hostels ..................................181 B&Bs and apartments .............182 Arrival ....................................186 Getting around ........................187 Directory A...Z ..........................188 Festivals and events ................193 Chronology .............................194 Index ......................................200


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5 INTRODUCTION TO NEW YORK CITY You could spend weeks here and still barely scratch the surface, but there are some key attractions and pleasures you won"t want to miss. e city is packed with vibrant ethnic neighbourhoods, like Chinatown and Harlem, and boasts the artsy enclaves of Chelsea, Tribeca and Greenwich Village. Of course, you will nd the celebrated modern architecture of corporate Manhattan in Midtown and the Financial District, complemented by row upon row of elegant brownstones in landmarked areas like Brooklyn Heights. en there are the city"s renowned museums, not just the Metropolitan Museum of Art or the Museum of Modern Art, but countless smaller collections the Old Masters at the Frick, the prints and manuscripts of the Morgan Library that a ord days of happy wandering. In between sights, you can (and should) eat just about anything, cooked in any style: silky Korean pork buns to pressed sea urchin sandwiches, Jewish deli to Jamaican food cart. You can drink in virtually any company at any time in any type of watering hole imaginable: unmarked cocktail dens that mix up the latest artisanal concoctions or joints where folks will look at you sideways if you order anything but a bottle of beer. You can see comedy or cabaret, hear jazz combos or jug bands, and attend obscure movies. e more established arts dance, theatre, opera and classical music are superbly catered for; and New York"s clubs are varied and exciting. GRAFFITI Best places for bagels and lox A bagel with cream cheese and lox is the city"s classic bite, found all over at caf s, delis, bagelries and speciality food shops though best sampled from a Jewish "appetizing" store (basically, a place that sells fish and dairy products) such as hundred year old, family owned Russ and Daughter"s (p.65). THESE ARE OUR OTHER FAVOURITES : > Absolute Bagels p.151 > Barney Greengrass p.151 > Zabar"s p.151


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6 INTRODUCTION TO NEW YORK CITY For the avid consumer, the choice of shops is vast, almost numbingly exhaustive, in this heartland of the great capitalist dream. You can spend your dollars at big names like Bloomingdale"s or contemporary designers like Marc Jacobs, and visit boutiques full of vintage garments or thri stores with clothes priced by the pound. New York City comprises the central island of Manhattan along with four outer boroughs Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx and Staten Island. To many, Manhattan is New York, and whatever your interest in the city it"s here that you"ll spend most time and, unless you have friends elsewhere, where you are likely to stay. at"s not to overlook the virtues of the other boroughs: the ragged glory of Coney Island, the stunning botanical gardens of the Bronx and Brooklyn, the upli ing Noguchi Museum in Long Island City, these are just a few of the sights that make worthy detours, and you"ll nd great neighbourhood restaurants and bars along the way. e subway and bus system can take you everywhere, but New York is underrated as a walking city, and you"ll want to spend plenty of time wearing out your shoes while taking it all in. WINDOW SHOPPING IN SOHO When to visit P retty much any time is a good time to visit New York. Winter can be bitingly cold but the city can be delightful during the run up to Christmas, when the trees are lit up, the windows decorated and shops open extra late. It"s coldest in January and February, coinciding with one of the few times to find bargains on "ights and hotels, and in any case New York has some wonderful crisp and clear sunny days even then. Spring, early summer, and autumn are the most appealing times to visit, when temperatures can be comfortably warm. It"s wise to avoid visiting between mid July and August: the temperatures tend be sweltering and the humidity worse. On the other hand, locals tend to leave town then, so weekends are less crowded.


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7 NEW YORK CITY AT A GLANCE >>EATING From street food to haute cuisine, it"s here, it"s excellent and it"s in abundance. Chinatown is most accessible for ethnic eats. ?e Lower East Side, traditional home to Jewish food, now teems with fashionable restaurants, while the East Village is the locus for everything from the recent ramen fad to late night pizza and hot dog joints. Some of the best and most expensive restaurants are just o Madison Square Park; continue up to Midtown for powerhouse names like the Four Seasons, Aquavit and one of the city"s quintessential eateries, the Oyster Bar. Further north, Harlem has fabulous soul food, barbecue and African restaurants. >>DRINKING Bars are everywhere and come in every stripe: pubs, dives, beer gardens, hidden speakeasies, exclusive hotel lounges. Drinkers descend on the Lower East Side and East Village, especially streets like Ludlow and Avenue A, which can seem like a carnival ... but are good destinations nonetheless. Rocker hangouts and swanky wine bars also hover around Union Square, and Ninth Avenue, starting in Chelsea and moving up to Hell"s Kitchen. ?e most exciting and characterful places are in the outer boroughs, speci?cally Long Island City, Williamsburg and Red Hook. Places are typically open till the wee hours of morning. >>NIGHTLIFE Clubbing hotspots jump around: the lower western edge of Soho one year, 27th Street in the far west of Chelsea another. ?e East and West Villages always o er a few standbys, and the Meatpacking District can be good if you"re looking for busy places to put on your dancing shoes. Keep your ears open, get current listings magazines and generally aim downtown. Music venues are more established: the West Village and Harlem have historic venues for jazz; Lincoln Center holds top spots for classical music, dance and opera, with Carnegie Hall just a few blocks away; and the coolest rock clubs are mostly around the Lower East Side. >>SHOPPING For big ticket retail, look no further than Midtown, speci?cally Fi h Avenue, where Saks, Bergdorf Goodman and many others congregate. Madison Avenue on the Upper East Side also has its share of famous brands. Somewhat edgier fashion can be found in Soho and Nolita : Prince and Spring streets are crammed with designer boutiques and hip jewellery and shoe shops. ?ose looking for vintage duds or the truly avant garde might ?nd the Lower East Side and Williamsburg more suitable. Antique hunters will have fun trolling around Chelsea and, on weekends, the Hell"s Kitchen Flea Market. NEW YORK CITY AT A GLANCE OUR RECOMMENDATIONS ON WHERE TO EAT, DRINK AND SHOP ARE LISTED AT THE END OF EACH PLACES CHAPTER.


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8 ITINERARIES 1 Starting point: Battery Park > p.38. Ferries set out from here to the Harbor Islands; leave early and plan on a full morning. 2 Statue of Liberty > p.40. One of the city"s most potent symbols is just as exciting up close as from a distance, especially if you climb the steps to the crown. 3 Ellis Island > p.40. The sensitive and moving museum drives home New York"s immigrant roots. > p.43. Back on shore, stop for lunch at Adrienne"s Pizzabar on pedestrianized Stone Street. 4 Stroll along Wall Street to see the buildings at the heart of world finance, then head up Trinity Place (Church Street) to the 1766 St Paul"s Chapel , with its 9/11 exhibit. Ground Zero is across the street. 5 The High Line > p.92. If you"ve got the time on your way uptown, take a stroll along this elevated promenade on the West Side. > p.129. For a pre theatre meal, choose from traditional dining spots such as Joe Allen and Chez Napoleon. 6 Taking in a Broadway play or musical is a must for theatre lovers; any venue will suffice, as long as the show is up to standard. > p.130. Atmospheric Jimmy"s Corner is full of crusty barflies and boxing memorabilia; a drink at the bar provides a fitting end to a full day. Day One in New York City


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